Students

Joanna Behrman

Joanna Behrman

Joanna holds an AB in Physics from Harvard University and an MA in the Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. Her past research has included the study of undergraduate physics teaching at Radcliffe College and a survey of early twentieth-century physics textbooks directed to home economics students. She is interested more broadly in the history of modern physics, including narratives of science, scientific pedagogy, and times of paradigm crisis.

email: jbehrma2@jhu.edu
Academia.edu: http://johnshopkins.academia.edu/JoannaBehrman

Kristin Brig

Kristin Brig

Kristin received a BA in history in 2015 as well as an MA in history in 2017 from the College of Charleston. Her past research has explored the history of smallpox vaccination in the nineteenth-century British Empire with a particular interest in how vaccine production, distribution, and implementation affected relationships at local, colonial, and global levels. She is currently interested in clean water supply and access in the nineteenth-century Cape Colony and Natal, especially the intersection of water shortages, contamination, and social/cultural tensions in port cities. She is more broadly interested in the racial and class dynamics of public health in British Africa.

email: kbrig1@jhmi.edu

Emily Clark

Emily Clark

Emily received her BA in History from the University of Arizona in 2015. Her past research has included a study of literary publications by patients of the New York State Lunatic Asylum at Utica during the 1850s. Her current research explores women's domestic healing work and popular print in Early America, with a focus on concepts of the body, cleanliness, and deviant sexuality. She is broadly interested in issues of gender, class, and race, particularly in relation to popular culture, print, vernacular medicine, and bodily spectacle.

email: eclark34@jhu.edu

Maya Koretzky

Maya Koretzky

Maya Koretzky received her BA from Cornell University in 2013. Her undergraduate work focused on the cultural and intellectual history of late 19th and early 20th century Russia with a particular emphasis on the history of neurobiology. Before coming to Hopkins she served as a fellow in the department of bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. At Hopkins, Maya is pursing an MD/PhD dual degree. Clinically, she hopes to specialize in Neurology. Maya's research interests have ranged from the history of race and organ transplantation to the early history of HIV. For her dissertation project, she is working on a history of Charity Hospital in New Orleans in the 19th Century.

email: mkoretz1@jhmi.edu
twitter: @koretzkymaya

Michael Healey

Michael Healey

Michael received his BA in biology and public health from the University of Rochester in 2016 as part of their early medical scholars program. After matriculating into medical school, he became increasingly interested in health policy and the medical humanities, and eventually decided to take leave to study the history of medicine. Broadly speaking, Michael is interested in how the evolution of psychiatric nosology reflects broader philosophical and sociopolitical trends. He is currently studying the intellectual history of dementia praecox and schizophrenia, focusing on how Adolf Meyer and his colleagues adapted these diagnostic categories to promote various changes in psychiatric theory and practice. After completing his PhD, Michael will return to Rochester to finish his undergraduate medical education and apply to residencies in psychiatry. Ultimately, he hopes that his historical research will inform both his clinical work and political advocacy.

email: mhealey4@jhmi.edu

Yixian Li

Yixian holds an MA in Communication, Culture, and Technology from Georgetown University, a certificate in International Affairs and Multilateral Governance from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland, and a BA in Sci-tech Policy and Communication from the University of Science and Technology of China. She is interested in the history of technology and techno-cities in modern East Asia.

email: yli101@jhu.edu

Emily Margolis

Emily Margolis

Emily holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from Princeton University and a master’s degree in history of science and technology from the University of Oklahoma. Her dissertation, "Space Travel at 1G: Space Tourism in Cold War America," explores the history of family vacations to space sites such as Cape Canaveral and Space Camp. She is interested in the ways in which Americans made personal meaning from space exploration as tourists and proprietors of space-themed attractions. Emily plans to pursue a curatorial career and has interned at the National Air and Space Museum, the National Museum of American Jewish History, and the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon in Dresden, Germany.

email: emily.margolis@jhu.edu

Ayah Nurridin

Ayah Nuriddin

Ayah received her BA in International Studies (International Peace and Conflict Resolution) and History from American University in 2009. She received a dual Masters in History and Library Science from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2014. Her Masters’ thesis, “Race, Sexuality, and the ‘Progressive Physician’: African American Doctors, Eugenics, and Public Health, 1900-1940,” examined the ways in which African American doctors and scientists interpreted and deployed eugenic thought within the context of racial uplift ideology. Her research interests include eugenics, birth control, disability, scientific racism, and public health.

email: anuridd1@jhmi.edu

Alex Parry

Alexander Parry

Alex received his B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley and his M.A. from the Literary and Cultural Studies program at the University of Oklahoma. His previous research analyzed how the domestic reformer Catharine Beecher combined religion and physiology to provide health advice for nineteenth-century American women. He has also examined how the turn-of-the-twentieth-century field of household bacteriology enabled housewives to test their homes and communities for microbes using kitchen equipment. As he prepares for his dissertation, Alex hopes to explore the relationships between risk, domestic space, and the family. His other interests include public health, home economics, natural theology, children’s literature, and the history of capitalism.

email: aparry2@jhmi.edu

Jonathan Phillips

Jonathan received a BA in History from Portland State University and an MA from the University of Chicago. His master’s thesis explored Julian Huxley’s “evolutionary humanism,” a new, secular religion which was intended to produce social reform through a process of directed cultural and biological evolution. His research interests revolve around the history of modern biology, especially social and political applications of evolutionary theory.

email: jphill69@jhu.edu

Emilie Raymer

Emilie Raymer

Emilie received a BA in History and American Studies from the College of William and Mary and an MA from the University of Chicago. Her master’s thesis used Thorstein Veblen’s The Theory of the Leisure Class to examine the integration of economics and Darwinian evolutionary theory in the late nineteenth century. She is interested in the history of biology, especially evolutionary biology, the development of social scientific disciplines, higher education in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and American intellectual and cultural history. She worked for the National Academy of Sciences before she started graduate work at Johns Hopkins.

email: eraymer1@jhu.edu

 

Sam Scharff

Sam Scharff

Sam received his BS in Zoology from the University of Oklahoma, and has completed three years of his MD program at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Upon completion of a PhD in the History of Medicine, he will finish his medical degree. Sam plans to pursue a career as a clinician, historian, and policy advocate.  His research more generally focuses on the historical intersections among psychiatry, law, political economy, and the carceral state. Sam’s dissertation will focus on the history of twentieth century North American psychiatric jurisprudence and the formation of medicolegal categories for personality disorders. He is ultimately interested in how these changing diagnoses have shaped mentally ill offenders’ trajectories between psychiatric care and the prison system.

emailsam.scharff@jhmi.edu

Anna Weerasinghe

Anna Weerasinghe

Anna Weerasinghe received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Religion from Princeton University in 2011 and a Master of Theological Studies degree in History of Christianity from Harvard Divinity School in 2014. Prior to beginning graduate studies at Johns Hopkins, she worked as a research fellow at the Center for Talent Innovation. Her dissertation investigates the practice and regulation of healing by and for women in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Portuguese India in order to ask how gender influenced contact between plural medical cultures in early modern colonial contexts.

emailaweeras1@jhmi.edu

 

Sarah Zanolini

Sarah Zanolini

Sarah Zanolini specializes in both the history and practice of Chinese medicine. She earned her B.A. in History from the University of California at Berkeley, her M.A. in Chinese Literature from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and an M.S. in East Asian Medicine from Dongguk University at Los Angeles. Clinically, Sarah resists narrow specialization while remaining most interested in conditions with varied symptomatology, periodicity, or that otherwise layer, or defy, biomedical explanation. Academically, her research interests encompass the relationship between diet and healing in medical practice, geographic and seasonal determinants of health and illness treatment, and the interplay between medical, religious, elite, and popular ideas in Chinese history. Her master’s thesis used close reading to historically and intellectually situate a set of 7th century medical manuscripts preserved in the Silk Road town of Dunhuang, China. She is currently researching how newly introduced food crops become incorporated into existing understandings of the medicinal actions of foods in the 16th and 17th centuries.

emailsjz@jhmi.edu