Students

Eli Anders

Eli Anders

Eli Anders received his AB in Social Studies from Harvard College. His dissertation explores convalescent homes and practices of convalescence in nineteenth and early twentieth-century Britain. He is interested in the history of public health, state knowledge-making practices, and the relationship between social knowledge, urban spaces, and health.

email: eanders@jhmi.edu
Academia.edu: http://johnshopkins.academia.edu/EliAnders

Joanna Behrman

Joanna Behrman

Joanna holds an AB in Physics from Harvard University and an MA in the Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. Her past research has included the study of undergraduate physics teaching at Radcliffe College and a survey of early twentieth-century physics textbooks directed to home economics students. She is interested more broadly in the history of modern physics, including narratives of science, scientific pedagogy, and times of paradigm crisis.

email: jbehrma2@jhu.edu
Academia.edu: http://johnshopkins.academia.edu/JoannaBehrman

Julia Cummiskey

Julia Cummiskey

Julia Cummiskey graduated from Carleton College with a BA in History and earned an MPH in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University. Her professional experience includes school programs at the New-York Historical Society, public health epidemiology at the New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and program management at the Montefiore School Health Program in the Bronx, NY. Her dissertation will examine the history of virus research at the Virus Research Institute in Entebbe, Uganda. Her research interests include the history of international public health, virology, and infectious diseases. She received a Fulbright Fellowship and a Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellowship from the SSRC in 2013 to support her dissertation research.

email: jcummis1@jhmi.edu
Academia.edu: http://johnshopkins.academia.edu/JuliaCummiskey

James Flowers

James received an MA in International Studies from the University of Technology Sydney. His master's thesis examined medical records in the Imperial Palace of Qing China. He was trained as a clinician of Chinese Medicine, which he taught at the University of Western Sydney. His current research includes the history of medicine in Choson Korea and Qing China.

email: jflower6@jhmi.edu

Matthew Franco

Matthew Franco

Matthew received his BA in Mathematics and History (honors) from Wesleyan University in 2007, and an MA in History of Science and Technology from Johns Hopkins University in 2011. Previous to his graduate work at Johns Hopkins, Matthew spent two years teaching high school mathematics. His research interests include the history of science in the Ibero-Atlantic nexus, the history of cartography, and the history of geographic thought. Matthew is currently completing a dissertation on the science of geography in eighteenth century Spain. Matthew was awarded a Graduate Research Fellowship for Fall 2013 by the Charles Singleton Center to fund research in Madrid, Spain. Matthew was also awarded a Dean's Teaching Fellowship for Spring 2014. MA thesis: Bridging the Divide: Science and Reform in the Spanish Navy (1783-1805).

email: matthew.e.franco@jhu.edu
Academia.edu: http://johnshopkins.academia.edu/MatthewEFranco

Pen Hardy

Penelope Hardy

Penelope holds a BS in Aerospace Engineering (Astronautics) from the United States Naval Academy and an MA in History from the University of North Florida. Her master's thesis examined contemporary British perception of the American Civil War as total and modern war. Her current work explores the historical intersection of technology and the ocean sciences, and specifically the role of research vessels and the cultures and practices surrounding their use from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. She is also interested in naval and maritime technologies more broadly and in the history of science fiction.

email: phardy6@jhu.edu

Layne Karafantis

Layne Karafantis

Layne holds a BA in Technical and Professional Writing from San Francisco State University, with concentrations in computer science and journalism, as well as an MA in History from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. At Johns Hopkins, Layne studies American technology in the twentieth century, with particular focus on the fields of aerospace and military command and control. Other interests include urban history and history of the American West. Under the auspices of a Dean's Teaching Fellowship, in fall 2014 Layne is teaching the course "Aviation in America" at Johns Hopkins. During spring 2015, having been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship at the National Air & Space Museum, Layne will complete dissertation work in Washington, D.C.

email: lkarafa1@jhu.edu

Seth LeJacq

Seth Stein LeJacq

Seth received his BA from Cornell University. His thesis uses Royal Navy sex crimes prosecutions from the long eighteenth century to explore body history, the social dynamics of face-to-face communities, medico-legal knowledge and practices, and the history of homosexuality. His dissertation research has been supported by a Singleton Center Travel Grant (2011), Institute of Historical Research Mellon Fellowship in the Humanities Pre-Dissertation Fellowship (2011), Council on Library and Information Resources Mellon Fellowship for Dissertation Research in Original Sources (2012-13), and a Social Science Research Council International Dissertation Research Fellowship (2012-13). He received the 2010 Roy Porter Student Essay Prize from the Society for the Social History of Medicine for a paper that has been published as "The Bounds of Domestic Healing: Medical Recipes, Storytelling and Surgery in Early Modern England," Social History of Medicine 26, no. 3 (2013): 451-68.

email: slejacq1@jhmi.edu
Academia.edu: http://johnshopkins.academia.edu/SethLejacq

Yixian Li

Yixian holds an MA in Communication, Culture, and Technology from Georgetown University, a certificate in International Affairs and Multilateral Governance from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland, and a BA in Sci-tech Policy and Communication from the University of Science and Technology of China. She is interested in the history of technology and techno-cities in modern East Asia.

email: yli101@jhu.edu

Adrianna Link

Adrianna Link

Adrianna received her AB from Bryn Mawr College in 2009, earning a dual degree in English and History. Her work focuses on twentieth century American anthropology, with a particular emphasis on research efforts and disciplinary changes after World War II. Other interests include: the use of films in anthropology, anthropological museums and exhibits, world’s fairs, and the visual display of cultures. Her dissertation examines the development of postwar urgent anthropology and its intersection with the environmental and conservation movements of the 1960s and 70s.

email: alink3@jhu.edu

Emily Margolis

Emily Margolis

Emily holds a bachelor's degree in Physics from Princeton University and a master's degree in the History of Science and Technology from the University of Oklahoma. At Johns Hopkins, she will further explore her interest in the social and cultural history of space exploration, with special attention to the role of women. Emily plans to pursue a curatorial career and has interned at the National Air and Space Museum, the National Museum of American Jewish History, and the Mathematisch-Physikalisher Salon in Dresden, Germany.

email: emily.margolis@jhu.edu

Kirsten Moore-Sheeley

Kirsten Moore-Sheeley holds a BA from Chapman University in History and Screenwriting and a Certificate in Global Health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research interests include the history of public health in East Africa, history of international and global public health, and the history of disease. Her dissertation will examine the history of bed nets in Africa.

email: kmoore44@jhmi.edu

Heidi MorefieldHeidi Morefield

Heidi holds a BA in International Development from McGill University and an MSc in Global Health and Public Policy from the University of Edinburgh. Prior to starting graduate work at Hopkins, she worked as a Project Manager for a USAID contractor in the DR Congo and Ghana. Her research interests include the production, circulation, and consumption of pharmaceuticals in a global health context, drug shortages, and biomedicine in the global south more generally.

email: heidi.morefield@jhmi.edu

Richard Stephen Nash

Richard received his BA in Philosophy from Georgetown University, and his MA in the History of Science and Technology from Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include the history of evolutionary biology and behavioral biology, the intersection of science and religion, and American intellectual history. His dissertation (in progress) examines the development of sensory physiology in the study of animal behavior, and the question of animal consciousness through the post-war period.

email: rnash2@jhu.edu

Ayah Nurridin

Ayah Nuriddin

Ayah received her BA in International Studies (International Peace and Conflict Resolution) and History from American University in 2009. She received a dual Masters in History and Library Science from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2014. Her Masters’ thesis, “Race, Sexuality, and the ‘Progressive Physician’: African American Doctors, Eugenics, and Public Health, 1900-1940,” examined the ways in which African American doctors and scientists interpreted and deployed eugenic thought within the context of racial uplift ideology. Her research interests include eugenics, birth control, disability, scientific racism, and public health.

email: anuridd1@jhmi.edu

Alicia Puglionesi

Alicia Puglionesi

Alicia holds a BA in English and Cognitive Science from the University of Pennsylvania. She has worked on the history of popular knowledge, health and hygiene texts, and amateur science in nineteenth-century America. Her current research centers on the sciences of mind and brain, particularly the questions of belief and doubt, orthodoxy, and marginality that constitute the field of turn-of-the-century psychical research.

email: apuglio1@jhmi.edu

Emilie Raymer

Emilie Raymer

Emilie received a BA in History and American Studies from the College of William and Mary and an MA from the University of Chicago. Her master’s thesis used Thorstein Veblen’s The Theory of the Leisure Class to examine the integration of economics and Darwinian evolutionary theory in the late nineteenth century. She is interested in the history of biology, especially evolutionary biology, the development of social scientific disciplines, higher education in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and American intellectual and cultural history. She worked for the National Academy of Sciences before she started graduate work at Johns Hopkins.

email: eraymer1@jhu.edu

Jean-Oliver Richard

Jean-Olivier Richard

Jean-Olivier graduated from Concordia University’s Liberal Arts College (Montreal) in 2009 and holds a BA in Western Society and Culture and Theoretical Linguistics. His main areas of interest are early modern and enlightenment natural history, encyclopedic endeavors, and the relationship between science and religion. Other interests include New France’s intellectual and military history, as well as cognitive sciences. Jean-Olivier’s dissertation will focus on the French Jesuit Louis-Bertrand Castel (1688-1757) and his system of the world.

Article: Richard, Jean-Olivier. “Bougainville à la lumière de ses lectures: Les références classiques dans les Écrits sur le Canada.” Revue d’histoire de l'Amérique Française 64, no. 2 (2012): 5-31. http://www.erudit.org/revue/haf/2010/v64/n2/1017837ar.pdf

email: jricha72@jhu.edu

Justin Rivest

Justin Rivest

Justin holds a Bachelor of Humanities (2008) and a Master of Arts in History (2010) from Carleton University in Ottawa. He is presently writing a dissertation on patent medicines and medical controversies in seventeenth century France. Justin’s academic interests include the history of astrology, the history of the book, and the history of the early modern French Atlantic world. His research has been supported by the Singleton Center and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

email: jrivest1@jhmi.edu
Academia.edu: http://johnshopkins.academia.edu/JustinRivest

Sam Scharff

Sam received his BS in Zoology from the University of Oklahoma, and has completed three years of his MD program at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Upon completion of an MA in the History of Medicine, he will finish his medical degree and practice psychiatry. Sam intends to complement his clinical work with historical research. His scholarly interests include the history of mental illness, especially its medicalization and criminalization, eugenics, intelligence testing, and scientific racism.

emailsam.scharff@jhmi.edu

Marion Schmidt

Marion Schmidt

Marion has a Magister Artium in History and European Ethnology from Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, writing her thesis on eugenics and education in the Weimar Republic and the biologic justifications of bourgeois interests. Before coming to Hopkins, she worked in innovation and ecology management and environmental engineering. Her dissertation is a cultural history of genetic deafness in the 20th century that explores how deafness was defined—as a pathology, a psychological deviance, a socio-cultural trait—and analyzes surrounding questions of identity, culture, perceptions of deafness, and treatment. More broadly, she is interested in the interdisciplinary history of eugenics and genetics, in particular the overlap with psychology, psychiatry, education, and pedagogy.

A second focus of Marion's work is the emerging identities and communities of people with autism and the overlap between biomedicine and disability activism. Her research has been supported by a Charlotte Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship for work on ethical and religious values from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation (2014).

email: mschmi34@jhmi.edu
Academia.edu: http://johnshopkins.academia.edu/MarionAndreaSchmidt