Graham Mooney, PhD

Graham MooneyAssociate Professor

Institute of the History of Medicine
The Johns Hopkins University
1900 East Monument Street
Baltimore, MD 21205

Tel: 443-287-6147
email: gmooney3@jhmi.edu
http://johnshopkins.academia.edu/GrahamMooney

Adjunct appointment in the Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health

Research Interests
History of public health nineteenth and twentieth centuries, UK and USA; infectious disease surveillance and control; historical geographies of health and medicine; historical epidemiology and demography; Co-editor of Social History of Medicine.

My recent book Instrusive Interventions: Public Health, Domestic Space, and Infectious Disease Surveillance in England 1840-1914 (University of Rochester Press, 2015), examines the history of public health interventions such as infectious disease notification, institutional and domestic isolation, disinfection, and contact tracing.

My next book project, Harm City? has emerged from a class that I teach at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The book uses a case study of race and class politics in Baltimore to explore the fracturing of public health systems and policy in the neo-liberal American city.

Recent Publications

Books
Instrusive Interventions: Public Health, Domestic Space, and Infectious Disease Surveillance in England 1840-1914 (University of Rochester Press 2015). Read the Introduction.

(co-edited with Jonathan Reinarz) Permeable Walls: Historical Perspectives on Hospital and Asylum Visiting (Clio Medica/Rodopi, 2009). 

Articles
'Washington and Welch talk about race: public health, history, and the politics of exclusion', American Journal of Public Health, 105:7 (July 2015), 1317-1328. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2015.302636.

(with Toke Aidt) ‘Voting suffrage and the political budget cycle: evidence from the London Metropolitan Boroughs, 1902-1937’, Journal of Public Economics, 112 (2014), 53-71. (Open Access, freely available). Also available here as CESifo Working Paper No. 4614 (January 2014).

‘The material consumptive: domesticating the tuberculosis patient in Edwardian England’, Journal of Historical Geography, 42:1 (2013), 152-166. (Open Access, freely available). 'Highly Commended' for the Journal of Historical Geography Prize, 2014.

‘Diagnostic spaces: workhouse, hospital and home in mid-Victorian London', Social Science History, 30:3 (2009), 357-90.

‘Second opinions: infectious diseases and epidemiologic transition in Victorian Britain? Definitely', Social History of Medicine, 20:3 (2007), 595-606.

Chapters
'Historical demography and epidemiology: the meta-narrative challenge,’ in Mark Jackson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Medicine (Oxford University Press, 2011), 373-92.

(with Jonathan Reinarz) ‘Hospital and asylum visiting in historical perspective: themes and issues,’ in Graham Mooney and Jonathan Reinarz (eds), Permeable Walls: Historical Perspectives on Hospital and Asylum Visiting (Clio Medica/Rodopi, 2009).

‘Infection and citizenship: (not) visiting isolation hospitals in Victorian Britain,’ in Graham Mooney and Jonathan Reinarz (eds), Permeable Walls: Historical Perspectives on Hospital and Asylum Visiting (Clio Medica/Rodopi, 2009).

‘British public health and the problem of local demographic structure,’ in Susan Gross Solomon, Patrick Zylberman and Lion Murard (eds), Shifting Boundaries of Public Health: Europe in the Twentieth Century (Rochester, University of Rochester Press, 2008).

Other publications
'Public health and primary care: Maryland's track record of innovation,' Epidemic Proportions, 10 (2013), 51-54. (Freely available here).

Teaching
150.711 Disease and Disease Control in Comparative Perspective (co-taught with Prof Randall Packard)
140.629 Beyond the Panopticon: Observing, Representing and Managing People (co-taught with Prof. Harry Marks)
140.336 Health, Risk, and History

SPH 550.609.01 Life and death in Charm City: Histories of Public Health in Baltimore, 1750 to the present (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Excellence in Teaching, 2013, 2014)
SPH 550.605.81 History of Modern Public Health (Online Class. View an introduction here.)